European Journal of Philosophy 27 (3):625-642 (2019)

Authors
Martin Sticker
University of Bristol
Paul Formosa
Macquarie University
Abstract
We discuss Kant’s conception of beneficence against the background of the overdemandingness debate. We argue that Kant’s conception of beneficence constitutes a sweet spot between overdemandingess and undemandingess. To this end we defend four key claims that together constitute a novel interpretation of Kant’s account of beneficence: 1) for the same reason that we are obligated to be beneficent to others we are permitted to be beneficent to ourselves; 2) we can prioritise our own ends; 3) it is more virtuous to do more rather than less when it comes to helping others; and 4) indifference to others is vicious. Finally, we explain how this represents a system of duties that gives our personal ends a moral standing without unacceptably moralising them.
Keywords Kant   beneficence  overdemandingess  virtue
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Reprint years 2019
DOI 10.1111/ejop.12455
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References found in this work BETA

Famine, Affluence, and Morality.Peter Singer - 1972 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 1 (3):229-243.
Moral Saints.Susan Wolf - 1982 - Journal of Philosophy 79 (8):419-439.
Kant’s Ethical Thought. [REVIEW]Allen W. Wood - 1999 - Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 62 (4):758-759.

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Citations of this work BETA

Kant on Education and Improvement: Themes and Problems.Martin Sticker & David Bakhurst - 2021 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 55 (6):909-920.
Kant-Bibliographie 2019.Margit Ruffing - 2021 - Kant Studien 112 (4):623-660.
Obligatory Actions, Obligatory Maxims.Samuel Kahn - 2021 - Kantian Review 26 (1):1-25.

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