Authors
Neil Forsyth
Université de Lausanne
Abstract
The opening story in Winesburg, Ohio by Sherwood Anderson is called simply “Hands.” It is about a teacher’s remarkable hands that sometimes seem to move independently of his will. This essay explores some of the relevant contexts and potential links, beginning with other representations of teachers’ hands, such as Caravaggio’s St. Matthew and the Angel, early efforts to establish a sign-language for the deaf, and including the Montessori method of teaching children to read and write by tracing the shape of letters with their hands on rough emery paper. The essay then explores filmic hands that betray or work independently of conscious intentions, from Dr Strangelove, Mad Love, to The Beast With Five Fingers. Discussion of the medical literature about the “double” of our hands in the brain, including “phantom hands,” leads on to a series of images that register Rodin’s lifelong fascination with sculpting separate hands.
Keywords No keywords specified (fix it)
Categories No categories specified
(categorize this paper)
Reprint years 2020
ISBN(s)
DOI 10.1515/texmat-2016-0006
Options
Edit this record
Mark as duplicate
Export citation
Find it on Scholar
Request removal from index
Revision history

Download options

PhilArchive copy


Upload a copy of this paper     Check publisher's policy     Papers currently archived: 59,700
Through your library

References found in this work BETA

Add more references

Citations of this work BETA

No citations found.

Add more citations

Similar books and articles

Closure On Skepticism.Sherrilyn Roush - 2010 - Journal of Philosophy 107 (5):243-256.
Contrastive Knowledge.Jonathan Schaffer - 2005 - In Tamar Szabo Gendler & John Hawthorne (eds.), Oxford Studies in Epistemology 1. Oxford University Press. pp. 235.
Complementary Strategies: Why We Use Our Hands When We Think.David Kirsh - 2012 - Avant: Trends in Interdisciplinary Studies 3 (T):161-175.
Why We Use Our Hands When We Think.David Kirsh - 1995 - Proceedings of the Seventheenth Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society.
Complementary Strategies: Why We Use Our Hands When We Think.David Kirsh - 1995 - Proceedings of the 17th Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society (T):161-175.
Complementary Strategies - Why We Use Our Hands When We Think.David Kirsh - 1995 - Proceedings of the Seventeenth Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society (T):161-175.
Punishing 'Dirty Hands'—Three Justifications.Stephen Wijze - 2013 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 16 (4):879-897.

Analytics

Added to PP index
2017-12-21

Total views
15 ( #659,958 of 2,432,319 )

Recent downloads (6 months)
7 ( #97,271 of 2,432,319 )

How can I increase my downloads?

Downloads

My notes