Hume Studies 20 (1):85-101 (1994)

Authors
James Franklin
University of New South Wales
Abstract
Throughout history, almost all mathematicians, physicists and philosophers have been of the opinion that space and time are infinitely divisible. That is, it is usually believed that space and time do not consist of atoms, but that any piece of space and time of non-zero size, however small, can itself be divided into still smaller parts. This assumption is included in geometry, as in Euclid, and also in the Euclidean and non- Euclidean geometries used in modern physics. Of the few who have denied that space and time are infinitely divisible, the most notable are the ancient atomists, and Berkeley and Hume. All of these assert not only that space and time might be atomic, but that they must be. Infinite divisibility is, they say, impossible on purely conceptual grounds.
Keywords Hume  Infinite divisibility of space
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ISBN(s) 0319-7336
DOI hume19942016
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References found in this work BETA

Abstract.[author unknown] - 2011 - Dialogue and Universalism 21 (4):9-9.
Computational Imagery.Janice Glasgow & Dimitri Papadias - 1992 - Cognitive Science 16 (3):355-394.
More on Part IX of Hume's Dialogues.James Franklin - 1980 - Philosophical Quarterly 30 (118):69-71.
Abstract.[author unknown] - 1998 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 29 (2):299-303.

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Citations of this work BETA

Perceiving Necessity.Catherine Legg & James Franklin - 2017 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 98 (3).

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