Models in Science

In Edward N. Zalta (ed.), The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy. Stanford (2006)
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Abstract

Models are of central importance in many scientific contexts. The centrality of models such as the billiard ball model of a gas, the Bohr model of the atom, the MIT bag model of the nucleon, the Gaussian-chain model of a polymer, the Lorenz model of the atmosphere, the Lotka-Volterra model of predator-prey interaction, the double helix model of DNA, agent-based and evolutionary models in the social sciences, or general equilibrium models of markets in their respective domains are cases in point. Scientists spend a great deal of time building, testing, comparing and revising models, and much journal space is dedicated to introducing, applying and interpreting these valuable tools. In short, models are one of the principal instruments of modern science.

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Author Profiles

Roman Frigg
London School of Economics
Stephan Hartmann
Ludwig Maximilians Universität, München

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