Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press (2014)

Authors
Helen Frowe
Stockholm University
Abstract
Most people believe that it is sometimes morally permissible for a person to use force to defend herself or others against harm. In Defensive Killing, Helen Frowe offers a detailed exploration of when and why the use of such force is permissible. She begins by considering the use of force between individuals, investigating both the circumstances under which an attacker forfeits her right not to be harmed, and the distinct question of when it is all-things-considered permissible to use force against an attacker. Frowe then extends this enquiry to war, defending the view that we should judge the ethics of killing in war by the moral rules that govern killing between individuals. She argues that this requires us to significantly revise our understanding of the moral status of non-combatants in war. Non-combatants who intentionally contribute to an unjust war forfeit their rights not to be harmed, such that they are morally liable to attack by combatants fighting a just war.
Keywords War  Self-Defence  Non-combatant immunity  reductivism  individualism  killing  bystanders  just cause  jus ad bellum  jus in bello
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Reprint years 2018
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ISBN(s) 0199609853   0198822456   9780199609857   9780198822455
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In Dubious Battle: Uncertainty and the Ethics of Killing.Seth Lazar - 2018 - Philosophical Studies 175 (4):859-883.
Accommodating Options.Seth Lazar - 2019 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 100 (1):233-255.
Provocateurs and Their Rights to Self-Defence.Lisa Hecht - 2019 - Criminal Law and Philosophy 13 (1):165-185.
War.Brian Orend - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
I—Rights Against Harm.Jonathan Quong - 2015 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 89 (1):249-266.

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