First and third-person approaches in implicit learning research

Consciousness and Cognition 15 (4):709-722 (2006)
Abstract
How do we find out whether someone is conscious of some information or not? A simple answer is “We just ask them”! However, things are not so simple. Here, we review recent developments in the use of subjective and objective methods in implicit learning research and discuss the highly complex methodological problems that their use raises in the domain.
Keywords *Implicit Learning  *Methodology
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DOI 10.1016/j.concog.2006.08.001
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References found in this work BETA
Characteristics of Dissociable Human Learning Systems.David R. Shanks & Mark F. St John - 1994 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (3):367-395.
Verbal Reports as Data.K. Anders Ericsson & Herbert A. Simon - 1980 - Psychological Review 87 (3):215-251.

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Citations of this work BETA
Implicit Learning and Acquisition of Music.Martin Rohrmeier & Patrick Rebuschat - 2012 - Topics in Cognitive Science 4 (4):525-553.
No-Loss Gambling Shows the Speed of the Unconscious.Andy Mealor & Zoltan Dienes - 2012 - Consciousness and Cognition 21 (1):228-237.

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