Pushing Intersectionality, Hybridity, and (Inter)Disciplinary Research on Digitality to Its Limits: A Conversation Among Scholars of Gender, Sexuality, and Embodiment

Journal of Digital Social Research 4 (3) (2022)
  Copy   BIBTEX

Abstract

During the past two decades or so, the emergence and ever-accelerating development of digital media have sparked scholarly interest, debates, and complex challenges across many disciplines in the social sciences and the humanities. Within this diverse scholarship, the research on digitality, gender, sexuality, and embodiment has contributed substantially to many academic fields, such as media studies, sociology, religion, philosophy, and education studies. As a part of the special issue “Gender, Sexuality, and Embodiment in Digital Spheres: Connecting Intersectionality and Digitality,” this roundtable consists of a conversation between five researchers from different (inter)disciplinary locations, all addressing matters of methodology, intersectionality, positionality, and theory in relation to the topics of gender, sexuality, and embodiment in digital spheres. Said roundtable begins with a critical self-positioning of the participants’ (inter)disciplinary and embodied locations using examples from their own research. The conversation then progresses to how these researchers have employed contemporary theories, conceptual vocabularies, methods, and analyses of gender, sexuality, and embodiment in digital spheres to then conclude with some ethico-political notes about collaborations between scholars and (digital) activists.

Links

PhilArchive

External links

Setup an account with your affiliations in order to access resources via your University's proxy server

Through your library

Similar books and articles

Talking Gender and Sexuality.Paul McIlvenny - 2002 - John Benjamins Publishing.
Disability, Feminism, and Intersectionability.Nancy J. Hirschmann - 2013 - Radical Philosophy Review 16 (2):649-662.

Analytics

Added to PP
2022-08-19

Downloads
39 (#301,494)

6 months
39 (#34,196)

Historical graph of downloads
How can I increase my downloads?

Author's Profile

Evelien Geerts
University of Birmingham

Citations of this work

No citations found.

Add more citations