Philosophical thought experiments, intuitions, and cognitive equilibrium

In Peter A. French & Howard K. Wettstein (eds.), Philosophy and the Empirical. Blackwell. pp. 68-89 (2007)
Abstract
It is a commonplace that contemplation of an imaginary particular may have cognitive and motivational effects that differ from those evoked by an abstract description of an otherwise similar state of affairs. In his Treatise on Human Nature, Hume ([1739] 1978) writes forcefully of this.
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DOI 10.1111/j.1475-4975.2007.00154.x
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References found in this work BETA
The Principles of Psychology.William James - 1890 - Dover Publications.
Theory of Knowledge.Keith Lehrer - 2000 - Westview Press.
A Treatise of Human Nature.David Hume - 1739/2000 - Oxford University Press.

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Citations of this work BETA
Alief in Action (and Reaction).Tamar Szabó Gendler - 2008 - Mind and Language 23 (5):552--585.
Object Persistence in Philosophy and Psychology.Brian J. Scholl - 2007 - Mind and Language 22 (5):563–591.
Intuitions Are Inclinations to Believe.Joshua Earlenbaugh & Bernard Molyneux - 2009 - Philosophical Studies 145 (1):89 - 109.

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