Social Theory and Practice 37 (3):483-509 (2011)

Authors
Anca Gheaus
Central European University
Abstract
I review three existing arguments in favor of having some childcare done by nonparents and then I advance five arguments, most of them original, to the same conclusion. My arguments rely on the assumption that, no matter who provides it, childcare will inevitably go wrong at times. I discuss the importance of mitigating bad care, of teaching children how to enter caring relationships with people who are initially strangers to them, of addressing children's structural vulnerability to their caregivers, of helping children and parents contain the ambivalent feelings of the child-parent relationship, and of distributing the responsibility of care and the ensuing blame for bad care more widely. I conclude that nonparental childcare should be universal.
Keywords Applied Philosophy  Social and Political Philosophy
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ISBN(s) 0037-802X
DOI 10.5840/soctheorpract201137328
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References found in this work BETA

After The Family Wage.Nancy Fraser - 1994 - Political Theory 22 (4):591-618.

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Citations of this work BETA

What Abolishing the Family Would Not Do.Anca Gheaus - 2018 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 21 (3):284-300.
Care Drain: Who Should Provide for the Children Left Behind?Anca Gheaus - 2013 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 16 (1):1-23.
Childhood Bads, Parenting Goods, and the Right to Procreate.Sarah Hannan & R. J. Leland - 2018 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 21 (3):366-384.
Parenthood and Procreation.Tim Bayne & Avery Kolers - forthcoming - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.

View all 13 citations / Add more citations

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