Early Science and Medicine 17 (1):62-86 (2012)

Abstract
This article examines the philosophical implications underlying Bacon's views on historical knowledge, paying special attention to that variety of historical knowledge described by Bacon as “natural.” More specifically, this article explores the interplay of history and fable. In the sphere of thought, fabula is the equivalent to materia in nature. Both are described by Bacon as being “versatile” and “pliant.” In Bacon's system of knowledge, philosophy, as the domain of reason, starts from historiae and fabulae, once memory and the imagination have fulfilled their cognitive tasks. This means that, for Bacon, there is no such thing as a pure use of reason. He advocates a kind of reason that, precisely because it is involved with matter's inner motions, is constitutively 'impure'. The article shows how the terms historia and fabula cover key semantic areas in defining Bacon's philosophy: historia may mean “history” as well as “story,” fabula “myth” as well “story.” In both cases, we can see significant oscillations from a stronger meaning to a weaker one, as if the power of nature decreases moving from histories and myths to stories. On the other hand, there are cases in which Bacon seems to stick to a diachronic view of the meaning of fables and histories, such that the transition from myths to history, especially natural history, is described as a collective effort towards reality and enlightenment.
Keywords FABLE   MATTER   INDUCTION   PHILOSOPHY   NATURAL HISTORY
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DOI 10.1163/157338212x631783
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Kant and Experimental Philosophy.Andrew Cooper - 2017 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 25 (2):265-286.
Is Baconian Natural History Theory-Laden?Daniel Schwartz - 2014 - Journal of Early Modern Studies 3 (1):63-89.
Francis Bacon’s “Perceptive” Instruments.Dana Jalobeanu - 2021 - Early Science and Medicine 25 (6):594-617.

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