"The Man Who Lived Underground": Jean-Paul Sartre And the Philosophical Legacy of Richard Wright

Sartre Studies International 17 (2):42-59 (2011)
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Abstract

Is Jean-Paul Sartre to be credited for Richard Wright's existentialist leanings? This essay argues that while there have been noteworthy philosophical exchanges between Jean-Paul Sartre, Simone de Beauvoir, and Richard Wright, we can find evidence of Wright's philosophical and existential leanings before his interactions with Sartre and Beauvoir. In particular, Wright's short story "The Man Who Lived Underground" is analyzed as an existential, or Black existential, project that is published before Wright met Sartre and/or read his scholarship. Existentialist themes that emerge from Wright's short story include flight, guilt, life, death, dread, and freedom. Additionally, it is argued that "The Man Who Lived Underground" offers a reversal of the prototypical allegory of the cave that we find in the Western (ancient Greek) philosophical tradition. The essay takes seriously the significance of the intellectual exchanges between Sartre, Beauvoir, and Wright while also highlighting Wright's own philosophical legacy

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Kathryn Gines
Pennsylvania State University

Citations of this work

Continental feminism.Jennifer Hansen - 2013 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
Continental feminism.Ann J. Cahill - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.

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