Consciousness and Cognition 10 (1):1-25 (2001)

Abstract
The literature on time perception is discussed. This is done with reference both to the ''cognitive-timer'' model for time estimation and to the subjective experience of apparent duration. Three assumptions underlying the model are scrutinized. I stress the strong interplay among attention, arousal, and time perception, which is at the base of the cognitive-timer model. It is suggested that a multiplicative function of two key components (the number of subjective time units and their size) should predict apparent duration. Implications for other cognitive domains are drawn, and in particular an analogy is suggested between apparent duration and apparent movement
Keywords *Models  *Phenomenology  *Time  *Time Estimation  *Time Perception
Categories (categorize this paper)
DOI 10.1006/ccog.2000.0468
Options
Edit this record
Mark as duplicate
Export citation
Find it on Scholar
Request removal from index
Revision history

Download options

PhilArchive copy


Upload a copy of this paper     Check publisher's policy     Papers currently archived: 64,159
Through your library

References found in this work BETA

Fundamental Aspects of Cognitive Representation.Stephen Palmer - 1978 - In Eleanor Rosch & Barbara Lloyd (eds.), Cognition and Categorization. Lawrence Elbaum Associates. pp. 259-303.
Automatic and Effortful Processes in Memory.Lynn Hasher & Rose T. Zacks - 1979 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 108 (3):356-388.
On the Economy of the Human-Processing System.David Navon & Daniel Gopher - 1979 - Psychological Review 86 (3):214-255.

View all 27 references / Add more references

Citations of this work BETA

View all 10 citations / Add more citations

Similar books and articles

Analytics

Added to PP index
2009-01-28

Total views
104 ( #104,949 of 2,454,826 )

Recent downloads (6 months)
2 ( #303,284 of 2,454,826 )

How can I increase my downloads?

Downloads

My notes