Refining Hitchcock’s Definition of ‘Argument’

Abstract

David Hitchcock, in his recent “Informal Logic and the Concept of Argument”, defends a recursive definition of ‘argument.’ I present and discuss several problems that arise for his definition. I argue that refining Hitchcock’s definition in order to resolve these problems reveals a crucial, but minimally explicated, relation that was, at best, playing an obscured role in the original definition or, at worst, completely absent from the original definition.

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G. C. Goddu
University of Richmond

References found in this work

Coalescent argumentation.Michael A. Gilbert - 1995 - Argumentation 9 (5):837-852.
Informal logic and the concept of argument.David Hitchcock - 2006 - In Dale Jacquette (ed.), Philosophy of Logic. North Holland. pp. 5--101.
Dialectics: A Controversy-Oriented Approach to the Theory of Knowledge.John Kekes - 1979 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 39 (4):603-604.

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