Religion, Interpretation, and Diversity of Belief: The Framework Model From Kant to Durkheim to Davidson

Cambridge University Press (1989)
Abstract
Different religious traditions offer apparently very different pictures of the world. How are we to make sense of this radical diversity of religious belief? In this book, Professor Godlove argues that religions are alternative conceptual frameworks, the categories of which organise experience in diverse ways. He traces the history of this idea from Kant to Durkheim, and then proceeds to discuss two constraints on the diversity of all human judgment and belief: first that human experience is made possible by shared, a priori rules, and second, that as language-users we must presuppose that we hold the vast bulk of our beliefs in common. Given these unavoidable constraints, it is clear how religions may offer encompassing symbolic systems that often diverge dramatically from one another. 'An original and brilliant critique of Durkheim and Kant from within the framework of Davidson's semantic theory. This book is required reading for anyone interested in the academic study of religion, and the problems of relativism and the diversity of belief.' -- Hans H. Penner, Dartmouth CollegeDifferent religious traditions offer apparently very different pictures of the world. How are we to make sense of this radical diversity of religious belief? In this book, Professor Godlove argues that religions are alternative conceptual frameworks, the categories of which organise experience in diverse ways. He traces the history of this idea from Kant to Durkheim, and then proceeds to discuss two constraints on the diversity of all human judgment and belief: first that human experience is made possible by shared, a priori rules, and second, that as language-users we must presuppose that we hold the vast bulk of our beliefs in common. Given these unavoidable constraints, it is clear how religions may offer encompassing symbolic systems that often diverge dramatically from one another. 'An original and brilliant critique of Durkheim and Kant from within the framework of Davidson's semantic theory. This book is required reading for anyone interested in the academic study of religion, and the problems of relativism and the diversity of belief.' -- Hans H. Penner, Dartmouth College
Keywords Religion History
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Call number BL51.G69 1989
ISBN(s) 0521361796   9780521361798
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Durkheim, Sellars, and the Origins of Collective Intentionality.Peter Olen & Stephen Turner - 2015 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 23 (5):954-975.
Where the Sidewalk Ends: The Limits of Social Constructionism.David Peterson - 2012 - Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 42 (4):465-484.
Embodied Critical Realism.Kevin Schilbrack - 2014 - Journal of Religious Ethics 42 (1):167-179.
Semantic Holism and Methodological Constraints in the Study of Religion.Mark Q. Gardiner - 2016 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 79 (3):281-299.

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