Economics and Philosophy 18 (1):111-139 (2002)

Abstract
Increasingly in the modern world, incentives are becoming the tool we reach for when we wish to bring about change. In government, in education, in health care, between and within institutions of all sorts, incentives are offered to steer people's choices in certain directions. But despite the increasing interest in ethics and economics, the ethics of the use of incentives has raised very little concern. From a certain point of view, this is not surprising. When incentives are viewed from the perspective of market economics, they appear to be entirely unproblematic. An incentive is an offer of something of value, sometimes with a cash equivalent and sometimes not, meant to influence the payoff structure of a utility calculation so as to alter a person's course of action. In other words, the person offering the incentive means to make one choice more attractive to the person responding to the incentive than any other alternative. Both parties stand to gain from the resulting choice. In effect, it is a form of trade, and as such, it meets certain ethical requirements by definition. A trade involves voluntary action by all parties concerned to bring about a result that is beneficial to all parties concerned. If these conditions were not met, the trade would simply not occur. And as inducements in a voluntary transaction, incentives certainly have the moral high ground over coercion as an alternative
Keywords No keywords specified (fix it)
Categories (categorize this paper)
DOI 10.1017/S0266267102001104
Options
Edit this record
Mark as duplicate
Export citation
Find it on Scholar
Request removal from index
Revision history

Download options

PhilArchive copy


Upload a copy of this paper     Check publisher's policy     Papers currently archived: 63,360
Through your library

References found in this work BETA

No references found.

Add more references

Citations of this work BETA

Undue Inducement: Nonsense on Stilts?Ezekiel J. Emanuel - 2005 - American Journal of Bioethics 5 (5):9-13.
Ending Concerns About Undue Inducement.Ezekiel J. Emanuel - 2004 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 32 (1):100-105.
Ending Concerns About Undue Inducement.Ezekiel J. Emanuel - 2004 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 32 (1):100-105.
Constraint, Consent, and Well-Being in Human Kidney Sales.P. M. Hughes - 2009 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 34 (6):606-631.
Gamification of Labor and the Charge of Exploitation.Tae Kim - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 152 (1):27-39.

View all 11 citations / Add more citations

Similar books and articles

Analytics

Added to PP index
2009-01-28

Total views
52 ( #204,752 of 2,448,828 )

Recent downloads (6 months)
9 ( #71,961 of 2,448,828 )

How can I increase my downloads?

Downloads

My notes