What Health Care Providers Know: A Taxonomy of Clinical Disagreements

Hastings Center Report 41 (5):27-36 (2011)
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Abstract

When, if ever, can healthcare provider's lay claim to knowing what is best for their patients? In this paper, I offer a taxonomy of clinical disagreements. The taxonomy, I argue, reveals that healthcare providers often can lay claim to knowing what is best for their patients, but that oftentimes, they cannot do so *as* healthcare providers.

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Author's Profile

Daniel Groll
Carleton College

Citations of this work

Medical Paternalism – Part 2.Daniel Groll - 2014 - Philosophy Compass 9 (3):194-203.
Well-being—more than health?Anna Hirsch - 2021 - Ethik in der Medizin 33 (1):71-88.
Medical Paternalism - Part 1.Daniel Groll - 2014 - Philosophy Compass 9 (3):194-203.
The Ethics of an Ordinary Doctor.William T. Branch - 2014 - Hastings Center Report 44 (1):15-17.

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References found in this work

Veatch Hates Hippocrates.John D. Lantos - 2010 - Hastings Center Report 40 (1):46-47.

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