Dordrecht, London and Boston: Kluwer Academic Publishers (2000)

Authors
Emily Grosholz
Pennsylvania State University
Abstract
This book draws its inspiration from Hilbert, Wittgenstein, Cavaillès and Lakatos and is designed to reconfigure contemporary philosophy of mathematics by making the growth of knowledge rather than its foundations central to the study of mathematical rationality, and by analyzing the notion of growth in historical as well as logical terms. Not a mere compendium of opinions, it is organised in dialogical forms, with each philosophical thesis answered by one or more historical case studies designed to support, complicate or question it. The first part of the book examines the role of scientific theory and empirical fact in the growth of mathematical knowledge. The second examines the role of abstraction, analysis and axiomatization. The third raises the question of whether the growth of mathematical knowledge constitutes progress, and how progress may be understood. Readership: Students and scholars concerned with the history and philosophy of mathematics and the formal sciences.
Keywords Mathematics Philosophy
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Reprint years 2010
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Call number QA8.4.G76 2000
ISBN(s) 9048153913   0792361512   9789048153916   9780792361510
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References found in this work BETA

Scientific Progress and Changes in Hierarchies of Scientific Disciplines.Volker Peckhaus - 2000 - In Emily Grosholz & Herbert Breger (eds.), The Growth of Mathematical Knowledge. Kluwer Academic Publishers. pp. 363--376.

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Citations of this work BETA

How to Think About Informal Proofs.Brendan Larvor - 2012 - Synthese 187 (2):715-730.
Against Mathematical Explanation.Mark Zelcer - 2013 - Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 44 (1):173-192.
Number Theory and Elementary Arithmetic.Jeremy Avigad - 2003 - Philosophia Mathematica 11 (3):257-284.

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