The Basis of Epistemic Trust: Reliable Testimony or Reliable Sources?

Episteme 4 (3):264-284 (2007)
Abstract
What is the nature of children's trust in testimony? Is it based primarily on evidential correlations between statements and facts, as stated by Hume, or does it derive from an interest in the trustworthiness of particular speakers? In this essay, we explore these questions in an effort to understand the developmental course and cognitive bases of children's extensive reliance on testimony. Recent work shows that, from an early age, children monitor the reliability of particular informants, differentiate between those who make true and false claims and keep that differential accuracy in mind when evaluating new information from these people. We argue that this selective trust is likely to involve the mentalistic appraisal of speakers rather than surface generalizations of their behavior. Finally, we review the significance of children's deference to adult authority on issues of naming and categorization. In addition to challenging a purely inductive account of trust, these and other findings reflect a potentially rich set of tools brought by children to the task of learning from people's testimony
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DOI 10.3366/E1742360007000081
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References found in this work BETA
An Inquiry Into the Human Mind on the Principles of Common Sense.Thomas Reid - 1997 - In Elizabeth Schmidt Radcliffe, Richard McCarty, Fritz Allhoff & Anand Vaidya (eds.), Late Modern Philosophy: Essential Readings with Commentary. Blackwell.
The Ontogenesis of Trust.Fabrice Clement, Melissa Koenig & Paul Harris - 2004 - Mind and Language 19 (4):360-379.

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Citations of this work BETA
Bullshit as a Problem of Social Epistemology.Joshua Wakeham - 2017 - Sociological Theory 35 (1):15-38.

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