The Grammar of the Human Life Process: John Dewey's new theory of language

Educational Philosophy and Theory 44 (s1):18-30 (2012)

Authors
Fred Harris
University of Manitoba
Abstract
Dewey proposed a new theory of language, in which the form (such as symbols) and content of language are not separated. The content of language includes the physical aspects of the world, which are purely quantitative: the life process, which involves functional responses to qualities, and the human life process, which involves the conscious integration of the potentiality of qualities to form a functional whole. The pinnacle of this process is individuality, or the emergence of a unique function to change social habits through a democratic process. However, there is a real danger that the form and content of language become split. To prevent such a split, Dewey proposed education through the basic occupations of the production of food, clothing and shelter
Keywords metaphysics  John Dewey  language  life process  grammar  human nature
Categories (categorize this paper)
Reprint years 2012
DOI 10.1111/j.1469-5812.2011.00744.x
Options
Edit this record
Mark as duplicate
Export citation
Find it on Scholar
Request removal from index
Revision history

Download options

Our Archive


Upload a copy of this paper     Check publisher's policy     Papers currently archived: 46,223
Through your library

References found in this work BETA

Colour Vision: A Study in Cognitive Science and the Philosophy of Perception.Evan Thompson - 1996 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 47 (2):339-343.

View all 16 references / Add more references

Citations of this work BETA

No citations found.

Add more citations

Similar books and articles

Analytics

Added to PP index
2011-04-15

Total views
26 ( #356,300 of 2,285,770 )

Recent downloads (6 months)
1 ( #835,767 of 2,285,770 )

How can I increase my downloads?

Downloads

My notes

Sign in to use this feature