The Speaking Abject in Kristeva's "Powers of Horror"

Hypatia 13 (1):138-157 (1998)

Abstract
This essay analyzes the implications of the performative aspects of Julia Kristeva 's Powers of Horror by situating this work in the context of similar aspects of her previous work. This construction and its relationship to abjection are integral components of Kristeva 's notion of practice and as such are fundamental to her critique of Hegel and Freud
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DOI 10.1111/j.1527-2001.1998.tb01355.x
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