Cambridge: MIT Press (1990)

Authors
Gary Hatfield
University of Pennsylvania
Abstract
Gary Hatfield examines theories of spatial perception from the seventeenth to the nineteenth century and provides a detailed analysis of the works of Kant and Helmholtz, who adopted opposing stances on whether central questions about spatial perception were fully amenable to natural-scientific treatment. At stake were the proper understanding of the relationships among sensation, perception, and experience, and the proper methodological framework for investigating the mental activities of judgment, understanding, and reason issues which remain at the core of philosophical psychology and cognitive science.
Keywords Cognitive Science  Epistemology  History  Mind  Perception  Psychology  Science  Spatiality  Helmholtz  Kant
Categories (categorize this paper)
Reprint years 1990, 1991
Buy this book Find it on Amazon.com
ISBN(s) 9780262080866   0262515350   0262080869
DOI 10.2307/2219697
Options
Edit this record
Mark as duplicate
Export citation
Find it on Scholar
Request removal from index
Revision history

Download options

PhilArchive copy


Upload a copy of this paper     Check publisher's policy     Papers currently archived: 69,078
Through your library

References found in this work BETA

No references found.

Add more references

Citations of this work BETA

The Pleasure of Art.Mohan Matthen - 2017 - Australasian Philosophical Review 1 (1):6-28.

View all 84 citations / Add more citations

Similar books and articles

Color Perception (in 3000 Words).Austen Clark - 1998 - In George Graham & William Bechtel (eds.), A Companion to Cognitive Science. Blackwell.
Spatial Perception and Geometry in Kant and Helmholtz.Gary Hatfield - 1984 - PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1984:569 - 587.

Analytics

Added to PP index
2009-01-28

Total views
151 ( #76,374 of 2,498,794 )

Recent downloads (6 months)
7 ( #102,133 of 2,498,794 )

How can I increase my downloads?

Downloads

My notes