Synthese 194 (11):4499-4518 (2017)

Authors
Remco Heesen
University of Western Australia
Abstract
I show that the social stratification of academic science can arise as a result of academics’ preference for reading work of high epistemic value. This is consistent with a view on which academic superstars are highly competent academics, but also with a view on which superstars arise primarily due to luck. I argue that stratification is beneficial if most superstars are competent, but not if most superstars are lucky. I also argue that it is impossible to tell whether most superstars are in fact competent or lucky, or which group a given superstar belongs to, and hence whether stratification is overall beneficial.
Keywords Philosophy of science  Social structure of science  Formal epistemology  Social epistemology  Network formation
Categories (categorize this paper)
Reprint years 2016, 2017
DOI 10.1007/s11229-016-1146-5
Options
Edit this record
Mark as duplicate
Export citation
Find it on Scholar
Request removal from index
Revision history

Download options

References found in this work BETA

The Structure of Scientific Revolutions.Thomas Samuel Kuhn - 1962 - Chicago: University of Chicago Press.
The Structure of Scientific Revolutions.Thomas S. Kuhn - 1962 - University of Chicago Press.
Accuracy and the Laws of Credence.Richard Pettigrew - 2016 - Oxford University Press UK.
A Nonpragmatic Vindication of Probabilism.James M. Joyce - 1998 - Philosophy of Science 65 (4):575-603.

View all 15 references / Add more references

Citations of this work BETA

Is Peer Review a Good Idea?Remco Heesen & Liam Kofi Bright - 2021 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 72 (3):635-663.
When Journal Editors Play Favorites.Remco Heesen - 2018 - Philosophical Studies 175 (4):831-858.

View all 11 citations / Add more citations

Similar books and articles

No Luck With Knowledge? On a Dogma of Epistemology.Peter Baumann - 2014 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 89 (3):523-551.
The Epistemic Analysis of Luck.Gregory Stoutenburg - 2015 - Episteme 12 (3):319-334.
Temporal Points of View.Steven Hales (ed.) - 1st ed. 2015 - Springer Verlag.
Luck and Decision.Will Barrett - 2006 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 23 (1):73–87.
A Defense of Lucky Understanding.Kevin Morris - 2012 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 63 (2):357-371.
What, and Where, Luck Is: A Response to Jennifer Lackey.Neil Levy - 2009 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 87 (3):489 – 497.
Competent Teachers and Competent Students.Bruce K. Eckland - 1980 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 3 (3):341-342.
L’Organisation des Musées : Une Évolution Difficile.André Desvallées & François Mairesse - 2011 - Hermès: La Revue Cognition, communication, politique 61 (3):, [ p.].
The Roles of Philosophy in Cognitive Science.Tim Van Gelder - 1998 - Philosophical Psychology 11 (2):117-36.
Knowledge, Luck and Lotteries.Duncan Pritchard - 2008 - In Vincent Hendricks (ed.), New Waves in Epistemology. Palgrave-Macmillan.

Analytics

Added to PP index
2016-09-24

Total views
219 ( #47,131 of 2,455,424 )

Recent downloads (6 months)
9 ( #73,594 of 2,455,424 )

How can I increase my downloads?

Downloads

My notes