What parents find important when participating in longitudinal studies: results from a questionnaire

Clinical Ethics 5 (1):28-34 (2010)
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Abstract

The objective of the present paper is to explore parents' views on safety and confidentiality, information and consent, the importance of different kinds of research, and their responsibilities regarding children's participation. A questionnaire was distributed to 2500 families in south-east Sweden with children born during the years 1997–1999; 1302 responded. The sample was chosen to include views of families with and without earlier research experience. A clear majority of responding parents stated that parents have a moral responsibility to let their children participate in research that is considered important, safe and moderately time-consuming. Respondents stressed the importance of thorough review and control of research involving children. Respondents also found it important that parents are guaranteed the right to decide about their children's participation and that they are thoroughly informed on central aspects of the study

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Mats J. Hansson
Uppsala Universitet

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Children, Longitudinal Studies, and Informed Consent.Gert Helgesson - 2005 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 8 (3):307-313.

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