Confronting coexistence in the United States: organic agriculture, genetic engineering, and the case of Roundup Ready® alfalfa [Book Review]

Agriculture and Human Values 30 (3):325-335 (2013)

Abstract
In agriculture, the principle of coexistence refers to a condition where different primary production systems can exist in the vicinity of each other, and can be managed in such a way that they affect each other as little as possible. Coexistence policies aim to ensure that farmers are able to freely grow the crops they choose—be they genetically engineered (GE), non-GE conventional, or organic. In the United States (US), the issue of coexistence has very recently come into sharp relief with the introduction of Roundup Ready® (RR) alfalfa, a landmark court decision in 2007 (Geertson v. Johanns), and subsequent governmental actions, including the first Environmental Impact Statement on a GE crop. By contrast, in 2003 the European Union (EU) created a policy to manage coexistence and to address economic harms that may be caused by contamination. We briefly review the EU framework as an instructive resource. This policy analysis then looks at the US organic industry and its standards with respect to GE before turning to the case of RR alfalfa. With a focus on the field trial stage and on environmental assessments prior to market approval, the case reveals numerous problems in the existing regulatory framework as it pertains to coexistence and prevention of contamination of organic products with GE material. The paper concludes with specific policy recommendations for creating a more robust coexistence policy in the US
Keywords Agricultural biotechnology  Coexistence  Genetic engineering  Organic agriculture  Coordinated Framework for Biotechnology  Roundup Ready® alfalfa
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DOI 10.1007/s10460-012-9394-6
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References found in this work BETA

Not in My Body: BGH and the Rise of Organic Milk. [REVIEW]E. Melanie DuPuis - 2000 - Agriculture and Human Values 17 (3):285-295.
Coexistence of Plants and Coexistence of Farmers: Is an Individual Choice Possible? [REVIEW]Rosa Binimelis - 2008 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 21 (5):437-457.
Forces Impacting the Production of Organic Foods.Karen Klonsky - 2000 - Agriculture and Human Values 17 (3):233-243.
Not in My Body: BGH and the Rise of Organic Milk. E. Dupuis - 2004 - Agriculture and Human Values 17 (3):285-295.

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Citations of this work BETA

Genetically Modified Crops, Inclusion, and Democracy.Daniel J. Hicks - 2017 - Perspectives on Science 25 (4):488-520.
Genetically Modified Crops, Inclusion, and Democracy.Daniel J. Hicks - 2017 - Perspectives on Science 25 (4):488-520.

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