The size-weight illusion, emulation, and the cerebellum

Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (3):407-408 (2004)

Abstract
In this commentary we discuss a predictive sensorimotor illusion, the size-weight illusion, in which the smaller of two objects of equal weight is perceived as heavier. We suggest that Grush's emulation theory can explain this illusion as a mismatch between predicted and actual sensorimotor feedback, and present preliminary data suggesting that the cerebellum may be critical for implementing the emulator.
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DOI 10.1017/s0140525x04320091
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