Authors
Miroslav Imbrisevic
Heythrop College
Abstract
Recently, David Boonin has put forward several objections to Carlos S. Nino's 'Consensual Theory of Punishment'. In this paper I will defend Nino against the 'explicit denial objection'. I will discuss whether Boonin's interpretation of Nino as a tacit consent theorist is right. I will argue that the offender's consent is neither tacit nor express, but a special category of implicit consent. Further, for Nino the legal-normative consequences of an act (of crime) are 'irrevocable', i.e. one cannot (expressly and successfully) deny liability to them. I will suggest an explanation for Nino's irrevocability claim
Keywords Carlos Nino  Punishment  Consent  Boonin  Explicit denial  Tacit consent
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ISBN(s) 0495-4548
DOI theoria201025223
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What We Owe to Each Other.Thomas Scanlon - 1998 - Belknap Press of Harvard University Press.
What We Owe to Each Other.Thomas Scanlon - 2002 - Mind 111 (442):323-354.
The Problem of Punishment.David Boonin - 2008 - Cambridge University Press.

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