The Mnemonic Consequences of Jurors’ Selective Retrieval During Deliberation

Topics in Cognitive Science 11 (4):627-643 (2019)

Abstract
Topics in Cognitive Science, EarlyView.
Keywords Collaborativeremembering  Collectivememory  Decision making  Forgetting  Jurydeliberation  RIF  RIFA  Selectiveretrieval
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DOI 10.1111/tops.12435
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Inhibitory Processes and the Control of Memory Retrieval.B. Levy - 2002 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 6 (7):299-305.

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