Authors
Sofia M.I. Jeppsson
Umeå University
Abstract
The belief that obese people ought to lose weight and keep it off is widespread, and has a profound negative impact on the lives of the obese. I argue in this paper that most obese people have no such obligation, even if obesity is bad, and caused by calorie input exceeding output. Obese people do not have an obligation to achieve long-term weight loss if this is impossible for them, is worse than the alternative, or requires such an enormous effort in relation to what stands to be gained that this option is supererogatory rather than obligatory. It is highly plausible that most obese people fall into one of these three groups. Politicians may still have obligations to fight obesity, but they ought to do so through progressive politics rather than blaming and shaming.
Keywords obesity  moral responsibility  prudential duties  supererogation  medical ethics
Categories (categorize this paper)
DOI 10.1353/ken.2015.0001
Options
Edit this record
Mark as duplicate
Export citation
Find it on Scholar
Request removal from index
Revision history

Download options

PhilArchive copy

 PhilArchive page | Other versions
External links

Setup an account with your affiliations in order to access resources via your University's proxy server
Configure custom proxy (use this if your affiliation does not provide a proxy)
Through your library

References found in this work BETA

The Concept of Moral Obligation.Michael J. Zimmerman - 1996 - Cambridge University Press.
Free Will Demystified: A Dispositional Account.Kadri Vihvelin - 2004 - Philosophical Topics 32 (1/2):427-450.
Deontic Morality and Control.Ishtiyaque Haji - 2002 - Cambridge University Press.

View all 8 references / Add more references

Citations of this work BETA

Obesity, Political Responsibility, and the Politics of Needs.Kaja Tulatz - 2019 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 22 (2):305-315.

Add more citations

Similar books and articles

Is Obesity a Public Health Problem?Jonny Anomaly - 2012 - Public Health Ethics 5 (3):216-221.
Addicted to Food, Hungry for Drugs.Bennett Foddy - 2011 - Neuroethics 4 (2):79-89.
The Obesity Epidemic: Medical and Ethical Considerations. [REVIEW]Jantina Vries - 2007 - Science and Engineering Ethics 13 (1):55-67.
Psychosocial Aspects of Childhood Obesity.Amy E. Sgrenci & Myles S. Faith - 2011 - In Luis Moreno, Iris Pigeot & Wolfgang Ahrens (eds.), Epidemiology of Obesity in Children and Adolescents. Springer Science+Business Media. pp. 419--429.
Childhood Obesity in the WHO European Region.Yannis Manios & Vassiliki Costarelli - 2011 - In Luis Moreno, Iris Pigeot & Wolfgang Ahrens (eds.), Epidemiology of Obesity in Children and Adolescents. Springer Science+Business Media. pp. 43--68.
Prevalence of Overweight and Obesity in Japan.Masao Yoshinaga, Tomoko Ichiki & Yoshiya Ito - 2011 - In Luis Moreno, Iris Pigeot & Wolfgang Ahrens (eds.), Epidemiology of Obesity in Children and Adolescents. Springer Science+Business Media. pp. 153--162.
Culture and the Evolution of Obesity.Peter J. Brown - 1991 - Human Nature 2 (1):31-57.
Childhood Obesity: Etiology-Synthesis Part II.Luis A. Moreno, Iris Pigeot & Wolfgang Ahrens - 2011 - In Luis Moreno, Iris Pigeot & Wolfgang Ahrens (eds.), Epidemiology of Obesity in Children and Adolescents. Springer Science+Business Media. pp. 483--492.

Analytics

Added to PP index
2015-04-07

Total views
29 ( #396,900 of 2,519,697 )

Recent downloads (6 months)
11 ( #66,535 of 2,519,697 )

How can I increase my downloads?

Downloads

My notes