Is Hobbes Really an Antirealist about Accidents?


Authors
Sahar Joakim
Saint Louis University
Abstract
In Metaphysical Themes, Robert Pasnau interprets Thomas Hobbes as an anti-realist about all accidents in general. In opposition to Pasnau, we argue that Hobbes is a realist about some accidents (e.g., motion and magnitude). Section One presents Pasnau’s position on Hobbes; namely, that Hobbes is an unqualified anti-realist of the eliminativist sort. Section Two offers reasons to reject Pasnau’s interpretation. Hobbes explains that magnitude is mind-independent, and he offers an account of perception in terms of motion (understood as a mind-independent feature of body). Therefore, it seems incorrect to call Hobbes an anti-realist about all accidents. Section Three considers Pasnau’s hypothetical response: he might claim that for Hobbes, motion reduces to body and does not exist in its own right. Section Four notes that reductionism about all accidents does not entail anti-realism about all accidents. Even granting Pasnau’s anticipated response, his anti-realist reading does not follow. Contra Pasnau, Hobbes is best understood as claiming that motion and magnitude exist mind-independently.
Keywords Hobbes   Pasnau   antirealism about accidents   body   motion
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DOI 10.31820/ejap.14.2.2
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References found in this work BETA

Leviathan.Thomas Hobbes - 2006 - In Aloysius Martinich, Fritz Allhoff & Anand Vaidya (eds.), Early Modern Philosophy: Essential Readings with Commentary. Blackwell.
Metaphysical Themes, 1274–1671.Robert Pasnau - 2011 - Oxford University Press.
Hobbes and the Phantasm of Space.Edward Slowik - 2014 - Hobbes Studies 27 (1):61-79.
Hobbesian Mechanics.Doug Jesseph - 2006 - In Daniel Garber & Steven Nadler (eds.), Oxford Studies in Early Modern Philosophy. Oxford University Press. pp. 3--119.

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