From impossible words to conceptual structure: The role of structure and processes in the lexicon

Mind and Language 19 (3):334-358 (2004)
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Abstract

The structure of words is often thought to provide important evidence regarding the structure of concepts. At the same time, most contemporary linguists posit a great deal of structure in words. Such a trend makes some atomists about concepts uncomfortable. The details of linguistic methodology undermine several strategies for avoiding positing structure in words. I conclude by arguing that there is insufficient evidence to hold that word-structure bears any interesting relation to the structure of concepts.

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2009-01-28

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Kent Johnson
Last affiliation: University of California, Irvine

Citations of this work

The ontology of words: a structural approach.Ryan M. Nefdt - 2019 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 62 (8):877-911.
On Travis cases.Agustin Vicente - 2012 - Linguistics and Philosophy 35 (1):3-19.
Meaning, Concepts, and the Lexicon.Michael Glanzberg - 2011 - Croatian Journal of Philosophy 11 (1):1-29.

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