In Olga Alieva, Annemare Kotze & Sophie Van der Meeren (eds.), When Wisdom Calls: Philosophical Protreptic in Antiquity. Turnhout. Belgium: Brepols Publishers. pp. 111-154 (2018)

Authors
Monte Johnson
University of California, San Diego
Abstract
This paper has three major aims. The first is to defend the hypothesis that Aristotle’s lost work Protrepticus was a dialogue. The second is to explore the genres of ancient apotreptics, speeches that argue against doing philosophy and show the need for protreptic responses; our exploration is guided by Aristotle’s own analysis of apotreptics as well as protreptics in his Rhetorica. The third aim is to restore to the evidence base of Aristotle’s Protrepticus an apotreptic speech that argues against doing Academic philosophy, evidence that was incorrectly excluded by Ingemar Düring in 1961.
Keywords Aristotle  Protrepticus  Protreptic  Rhetoric  Isocrates  Cicero  Dialogue
Categories (categorize this paper)
Options
Edit this record
Mark as duplicate
Export citation
Find it on Scholar
Request removal from index
Revision history

Download options

Our Archive
External links

Setup an account with your affiliations in order to access resources via your University's proxy server
Configure custom proxy (use this if your affiliation does not provide a proxy)
Through your library

References found in this work BETA

Add more references

Citations of this work BETA

No citations found.

Add more citations

Similar books and articles

Authenticating Aristotle's Protrepticus.Monte Ransome Johnson & D. S. Hutchinson - 2005 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 29:193-294.
Aristotle: Protrepticus, a Reconstruction.A. Chroust - 1964 - University of Notre Dame Press.
Isocrates, Plato, and Aristotle on Rhetoric.Chloe Balla - 2004 - Rhizai. A Journal for Ancient Philosophy and Science 1:45-71.

Analytics

Added to PP index
2019-02-20

Total views
228 ( #34,131 of 2,325,990 )

Recent downloads (6 months)
72 ( #7,584 of 2,325,990 )

How can I increase my downloads?

Downloads

My notes