Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 10 (2):148-160 (2016)

Abstract
There is a growing consensus in both academic and popular reflections on sport that if the accuracy of officiating can be improved by technology, then such assistance ought to be introduced. Indeed, apart from certain practical concerns about technologizing officiating there are few normative objections, and those that are voiced are often poorly articulated and quickly dismissed by critics. In this paper, we take up one of these objections – what is referred to as the loss of the human element in sport – and try to provide a firmer foundation for the disquiet that some feel at the threat of its loss. Briefly, it is argued that the cost of trying to eliminate all error in officiating through technological means is an understanding of sport as a practice through which human beings can reconcile themselves with the fallibilities and contingencies of life, in a forum where such losses can safely be experienced. After considering both practical and normative counter-arguments against the implementatio...
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DOI 10.1080/17511321.2016.1152287
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References found in this work BETA

The View From Nowhere.Thomas Nagel - 1986 - Behaviorism 15 (1):73-82.
Are Rules All an Umpire Has to Work With?J. S. Russell - 1999 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 26 (1):27-49.
Are There Any Good Arguments Against Goal-Line Technology?Emily Ryall - 2012 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 6 (4):439-450.
The Philosophy of Umpiring and the Introduction of Decision-Aid Technology.Harry Collins - 2010 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 37 (2):135-146.

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The Philosophy of Umpiring and the Introduction of Decision-Aid Technology.Harry Collins - 2010 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 37 (2):135-146.
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Refereeing and Technology–Reflections on Collins' Proposals.Richard Royce - 2012 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 39 (1):53-64.
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