The Cosmological Aesthetic Worldview in Van Gogh’s Late Landscape Paintings

Cosmos and History 12 (1):218-237 (2016)
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Abstract

Some artworks are called sublime because of their capacity to move human imagination in a different way than the experience of beauty. The following discussion explores how Van Gogh’s The Starry Night along with some of his other late landscape paintings accomplish this peculiar movement of imagination thus qualifying as sublime artworks. These artworks constitute examples of the higher aesthetic principles and must be judged according to the cosmological-aesthetic criteria for they manage to generate a transition between ethos and phusis and present them in unity. Here, referring to Heraclitean, Kantian, Nietzschean and Heideggerian metaphysics and aesthetics, I propose that the principles of motion and transition be the new cosmologic-aesthetic categories for the judgment of sublime artworks as well as for the understanding of the world (Weltanschauung) they represent.

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The Art of Truth.Gregory Schufreider - 2010 - Research in Phenomenology 40 (3):331-362.
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Erman Kaplama
Yasar University

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Kant and the exact sciences.Michael Friedman - 1992 - Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press.
The birth of tragedy.Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche - 1872 - New York: Oxford University Press. Edited by Oscar Levy & William A. Haussmann.
The Birth of Tragedy.Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche - 1992 [1886] - New York: Oxford University Press UK. Edited by Oscar Levy & William A. Haussmann.

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