Business Ethics Quarterly 25 (2):191-212 (2015)

Authors
Michael Kates
Saint Joseph's University of Pennsylvania
Abstract
This article examines the “Choice Argument” for sweatshops, i.e., the claim that it is morally wrong or impermissible for third parties to interfere with the choice of sweatshop workers to work in sweatshops. The Choice Argument seeks, in other words, to shift the burden of proof onto those who wish to regulate sweatshop labor. It does so by forcing critics of sweatshops to specify the conditions under which it is morally permissible to interfere with sweatshop workers’ choice. My aim in this article is to meet that burden. Unlike other critics of sweatshop labor, however, my argument does not proceed from contested economic or moral assumptions. To the contrary, my strategy will be to demonstrate that even if we grant the truth of the economic and moral assumptions made by defenders of the Choice Argument, it never- theless does not follow that it is morally wrong to interfere with the choice of sweatshop workers to work in sweatshops. The Choice Argument thus fails on its own terms.
Keywords sweatshops  choice  autonomy  preference  labor regulation
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DOI 10.1017/beq.2015.9
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References found in this work BETA

Sweatshops, Choice, and Exploitation.Matt Zwolinski - 2007 - Business Ethics Quarterly 17 (4):689-727.

View all 27 references / Add more references

Citations of this work BETA

Business Ethics.Jeffrey Moriarty - 2016 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
Sweatshop Regulation and Workers’ Choices.Jessica Flanigan - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 153 (1):79-94.
Sweatshop Regulation: Tradeoffs and Welfare Judgements.Benjamin Powell - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 151 (1):29-36.

View all 22 citations / Add more citations

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