In Vincent Müller (ed.), Philosophy and theory of artificial intelligence 2017. Springer. pp. 259-272 (2017)

Authors
Geoff Keeling
Stanford University
Abstract
Suppose that an autonomous vehicle encounters a situation where (i) imposing a risk of harm on at least one person is unavoidable; and (ii) a choice about how to allocate risks of harm between different persons is required. What does morality require in these cases? Derek Leben defends a Rawlsian answer to this question. I argue that we have reason to reject Leben’s answer.
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References found in this work BETA

The Idea of Justice.Amartya Sen - 2009 - Belknap Press of Harvard University Press.
Justice as Fairness: A Restatement.John Rawls (ed.) - 2001 - Harvard University Press.
A Rawlsian Algorithm for Autonomous Vehicles.Derek Leben - 2017 - Ethics and Information Technology 19 (2):107-115.
Comparing Harms: Headaches and Human Lives.Alastair Norcross - 1997 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 26 (2):135-167.
Justifiability to Each Person.Derek Parfit - 2003 - Ratio 16 (4):368–390.

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