Gender is an organon

Zygon 25 (2):139-150 (1990)
Abstract
. Gender is a social construct. Technically, it is a grammatical structuring category that may refer to sex, as is typical of Indo‐European languages, or to another set of features such as animate versus inanimate, as is typical of Algonkian languages. Gender in language forces speakers of the language to be continually conscious of application of the category, and they tend to project the categorization into their experience of the world and collocate observations under these broad categories. Western science has been developed by speakers of Indo‐European languages employing male/female genders, and in a cultural tradition that at least since the time of Classical Greece has collocated male with active, creative, rational, and public /dominant , and female with passive, irrational/emotional, and private /subordinate. Religion and science‐organons for rendering existential experience intelligible‐have always been used by the dominant class as instruments of power, and therefore in Western cultures have been entangled with legitimization of a congeries of concepts collocated with male gender. This paper illustrates the social construction of this congeries by contrasting it with non‐Western usages and valuations
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DOI 10.1111/j.1467-9744.1990.tb00876.x
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References found in this work BETA
Outline of a Theory of Practice.Pierre Bourdieu - 1981 - Human Studies 4 (3):273-278.
The Discourse of Modernism.Timothy J. Reiss - 1982 - Cornell University Press.

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