Some difficult intuitions for the principle of universality

Utilitas 21 (4):478-488 (2009)

Authors
Stephen Kershnar
Fredonia State University
Abstract
The Principle of Universality asserts that a part retains its intrinsic value regardless of the whole in which it is a part or even whether it is part of a whole. The idea underlying this principle is that the intrinsic value of a thing supervenes on its intrinsic properties. Since the intrinsic properties remain unchanged so does the thing’s intrinsic value. In this article, I argue that, properly understood, the Principle of Universality can handle seemingly troublesome intuitions about the relative intrinsic value of a vicious person having pain and his having pleasure. I specifically argue that the intuition that the former state is better is explained by the nature of the basic intrinsic-value states, which involve a person having a level of well-being and desert at a time. One implication of this is that given the nature of such basic intrinsic-value states, pleasure and pain are not value-bearing parts of virtuous and vicious attitudes.
Keywords Intrinsic Value  Principle of Universality  Higher Order Goods  Desert  Virtue  Pleasure  Organic Unities  Supervenience
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DOI 10.1017/s0953820809990239
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References found in this work BETA

Rethinking Intrinsic Value.Shelly Kagan - 1998 - The Journal of Ethics 2 (4):277-297.
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