Quantum Teleportation


Abstract
Quantum information differs profoundly from classical information by virtue of the properties, implications, and uses of quantum entanglement—the non-separable correlations among parts of a quantum system. John Bell’s famous theorem on the incompatibility of quantum mechanics with local hidden-variable theories established that these correlations have no classical counterpart.[1] More recently, new algorithms for quantum computation and communication make clear that quantum entanglement is essential for accomplishing otherwise impossible tasks. Perhaps the most remarkable of such possibilities is quantum teleportation, whereby an unknown quantum state is “disembodied” into quantum and classical components and resurrected at a remote location via quantum entanglement
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DOI 10.1007/978-94-017-1454-9_10
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