The inner cathedral: Mental architecture in high scholasticism

Vivarium 46 (3):253-274 (2008)

Authors
Peter R. King
Nottingham University (PhD)
Abstract
Mediaeval psychological theory was a “faculty psychology”: a confederation of semiautonomous sub-personal agents, the interaction of which constitutes our psychological experience. One such faculty was intellective appetite, that is, the will. On what grounds was the will taken to be a distinct faculty? After a brief survey of Aristotle's criteria for identifying and distinguishing mental faculties, I look in some detail at the mainstream mediaeval view, given clear expression by Thomas Aquinas, and then at the dissenting views of John Duns Scotus and William of Ockham. I conclude with some reflections on why the mainstream mediaeval view was discarded by Descartes.
Keywords MEDIEVAL PSYCHOLOGY   OCKHAM   SCOTUS   AQUINAS   MENTAL FACULTIES   WILL
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DOI 10.1163/156853408x360911
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References found in this work BETA

Thomas Aquinas on the Will as Rational Appetite.David M. Gallagher - 1991 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 29 (4):559-584.

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Aquinas and Aristotelians on Whether the Soul is a Group of Powers.Nicholas Kahm - 2017 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 4 (2):115-32.
Mind and Hylomorphism.Robert Pasnau - 2012 - In John Marenbon (ed.), The Oxford Handbook to Medieval Philosophy. Oxford University Press.

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