The Nature of Mathematical Knowledge

Oxford University Press (1983)
Authors
Philip Kitcher
Columbia University
Abstract
This book argues against the view that mathematical knowledge is a priori,contending that mathematics is an empirical science and develops historically,just as ...
Keywords Mathematics Philosophy
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Reprint years 1985
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Call number QA8.4.K53 1983
ISBN(s) 0195035410   9780195035414  
DOI 10.2307/2219556
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