Goods

Philosophy of Management 7 (1):107-122 (2008)
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Abstract

Parts 1 to 3 of this paper explore the theoretical rationale and ethical significance of Alasdair MacIntyre’s twin distinctions between goods internal and external to practices and between goods of excellence and of effectiveness. Parts 4 and 5 then relate this analysis to his critique of contemporary institutions, compartmentalisation and management. My argument is that these concepts express a teleological theory of why and how goods should be ordered which, in refusing to identify practical rationality with institutional actuality and instead differentiating between rival traditions, progresses beyond the theories of Aristotle and of other, past and present anglophone Aristotelians.

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References found in this work

The Misappropriation of MacIntyre.Ron Beadle - 2002 - Philosophy of Management 2 (2):45-54.
Eudaimonia, external results, and choosing virtuous actions for themselves.Jennifer Whiting - 2002 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 65 (2):270-290.
The nicomachean account of philia.Jennifer Whiting - 2006 - In Richard Kraut (ed.), The Blackwell Guide to Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics. Oxford, UK: Blackwell. pp. 276--304.
Eudaimonia, External Results, and Choosing Virtuous Actions for Themselves.Jennifer Whiting - 2002 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 65 (2):270-290.
Aristotle: ontology and moral reasoning.David Charles - 1986 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 4:19-144.

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