Objectivity, Science and Society: Interpreting Nature and Society in the Age of the Crisis of Science

Routledge (1986)

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Abstract
Originally published in 1986. This work remains of compelling interest to those concerned with the natural sciences and their social problems. It puts forward original and unorthodox ideas about the philosophy of and sociology of science, starting from the conviction that modern societies face deep problems arising from unresolved dilemmas about the meaning, content and technical applications of the theories of nature they employ. The book draws on insights developed within a variety of traditions to explore these problems, especially the work of Edmund Husserl and modern critical theory
Keywords Science Philosophy  Science Social aspects  Objectivity
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Reprint years 2008, 2014
Call number Q175.K65 1986
ISBN(s) 9780203706343   9780415474870   0710203810   0415474876
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