A philosophy of science for the twenty‐first century

Philosophy of Science 70 (1):1-14 (2003)

Authors
Janet Kourany
University of Notre Dame
Abstract
Two major reasons feminists are concerned with science relate to science's social effects: that science can be a powerful ally in the struggle for equality for women; and that all too frequently science has been a generator and perpetuator of inequality. This concern with the social effects of science leads feminists to a different mode of appraising science from the purely epistemic one prized by most contemporary philosophers of science. The upshot, I suggest, is a new program for philosophy of science, a program for a socially responsible philosophy of science.
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DOI 10.1086/367864
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References found in this work BETA

The Scientific Image.Michael Friedman - 1982 - Journal of Philosophy 79 (5):274-283.
Science, Truth, and Democracy.A. Bird - 2003 - Mind 112 (448):746-749.
Science Without Laws.M. Suarez - 2002 - Mind 111 (441):111-114.

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Citations of this work BETA

Bias and Values in Scientific Research.Torsten Wilholt - 2009 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 40 (1):92-101.
State of the Field: Transient Underdetermination and Values in Science.Justin Biddle - 2013 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 44 (1):124-133.

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