Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (5):705-706 (2005)

Abstract
We agree that human culture is unique. However, we also believe that an understanding of the evolution of culture requires a comparative approach. We offer examples of collaborative behaviors from dolphin play, and argue that consideration should be given to whether various forms of culture are best viewed as falling along a continuum or as discrete categories.
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DOI 10.1017/s0140525x05370129
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