Private Conscience, Public Acts

Journal of Medical Ethics 33 (5):249-254 (2007)
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Abstract

A growing number of medical professionals claim a right of conscience, a right to refuse to perform any professional duty they deem immoral—and to do so with impunity. We argue that professionals do not have the unqualified right of conscience. At most they have a highly qualified right. We focus on the claims of pharmacists, since they are the professionals most commonly claiming this right.

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Hugh LaFollette
University of South Florida

References found in this work

Brain Death and Personal Identity.Michael B. Green & Daniel Wikler - 2009 - In John P. Lizza (ed.), Philosophy and Public Affairs. Johns Hopkins University Press. pp. 105 - 133.
Is It Time to Abandon Brain Death?Robert D. Truog - 1997 - Hastings Center Report 27 (1):29.
Brain Death and Personal Identity.Michael B. Green & Daniel Wikler - 1980 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 9 (2):105-133.

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