Once more on the two truths: What does Chi–Tsang mean by the two truths as ‘Yüeh–Chiao’?

Religious Studies 19 (4):505 - 521 (1983)
Abstract
The teaching of the Buddha concerning Reality has recourse to Two Truths: the Mundane and the Highest Truth. Without knowing the distinction between the two, one does not know the profound point of the teachings. The Highest Truth cannot be taught apart from the Mundane, but without understanding the former, one does not apprehend nirvāna
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DOI 10.1017/S0034412500015535
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