Studies on the Derveni Papyrus

Oxford University Press UK (1996)
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Abstract

The Derveni papyrus is the oldest literary papyrus ever found, and one of the very few from Greece itself, which makes it one of the most interesting new texts from the ancient Greek world to have been discovered this century. The eschatological doctrines and an allegorical commentary on an Orphic theogony in terms of Presocratic physics which it contains make it a uniquely important document for the history of ancient Greek religion, philosophy, and literary criticism. This book is the first to have been published on the text. It includes a full and reliable translation of the Papyrus together with a range of articles by leading European and American classicists who are internationally recognised experts in Greek religion and philosophy. Professor K. Tsantsanoglou, who will publish the papyrus when work on it is complete, presents important new material and has checked all the articles against the Papyrus. Thus for the first time, material is provided which will authorize scholarship upon the Papyrus in a way hitherto impossible, will stimulate further work on it, and will make the book a standard reference work on the subject for years to come.

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Monetisation and the Genesis of the Western Subject.Richard Seaford - 2012 - Historical Materialism 20 (1):78-102.
Oracles of Orpheus? The Orphic Gold Tablets.Crystal Addey - 2012 - International Journal of the Platonic Tradition 6 (1):115-127.

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