Primitive Self-consciousness and Avian Cognition

The Monist 95 (3):486-510 (2012)
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Abstract

Recent work in moral theory has seen the refinement of theories of moral standing, which increasingly recognize a position of intermediate standing between fully self-conscious entities and those which are merely conscious. Among the most sophisticated concepts now used to denote such intermediate standing is that of primitive self-consciousness, which has been used to more precisely elucidate the moral standing of human newborns. New research into the structure of the avian brain offers a revised view of the cognitive abilities of birds. When this research is approached with a species-specific focus, it appears likely that one familiar species, the chicken (Gallus gallus domesticus), also exhibits primitive self-consciousness. Given the likelihood that they are primitively self-consciousness, chickens warrant a degree of moral standing that falls short of that enjoyed by persons, but which exceeds the minimal standing of merely conscious entities.

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Author's Profile

Andy Lamey
University of California, San Diego

References found in this work

Practical Ethics.Peter Singer - 1979 - Cambridge University Press.
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Animal Liberation.Bill Puka & Peter Singer - 1977 - Philosophical Review 86 (4):557.
Abortion and Infanticide.Michael Tooley - 1972 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 2 (1):37-65.

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