Philosophical Psychology 17 (1):107-123 (2004)

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Abstract
William Uttal's The new phrenology is a broad attack on localization in cognitive neuroscience. He argues that even though the brain is a highly differentiated organ, "high level cognitive functions" should not be localized in specific brain regions. First, he argues that psychological processes are not well-defined. Second, he criticizes the methods used to localize psychological processes, including imaging technology: he argues that variation among individuals compromises localization, and that the statistical methods used to construct activation maps are flawed. Neither criticism is compelling. First, as we illustrate, there are behavioral measures which offer at least weak constraints on psychological attribution. Second, though imaging does face methodological difficulties associated with variation among individuals, these are broadly acknowledged; moreover, his specific criticisms of the imaging work, and in particular of fMRI, misrepresent the methodology. In concluding, we suggest a way of framing the issues that might allow us to resolve differences between localizationist models and more distributed models empirically
Keywords Behavioral Sciences  Imaging  Localization  Phrenology  Science  Uttal, W
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DOI 10.1080/0951508042000202417
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References found in this work BETA

Response to Bechtel and Lloyd.William R. Uttal - 2002 - Brain and Mind 3 (1):261-273.

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Citations of this work BETA

Images Are Not the Evidence in Neuroimaging.Colin Klein - 2010 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 61 (2):265-278.
Philosophical Issues in Neuroimaging.Colin Klein - 2010 - Philosophy Compass 5 (2):186-198.
The Analysis of Data and the Evidential Scope of Neuroimaging Results.Jessey Wright - 2018 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 69 (4):1179-1203.
Evidence in Neuroimaging: Towards a Philosophy of Data Analysis.Jessey Wright - 2017 - Dissertation, The University of Western Ontario

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