Locke’s arguments against the freedom to will


Authors
Matthew A. Leisinger
Cambridge University
Abstract
In sections 2.21.23-25 of An Essay concerning Human Understanding, John Locke considers and rejects two ways in which we might be “free to will”, which correspond to the Thomistic distinction between freedom of exercise and freedom of specification. In this paper, I examine Locke’s arguments in detail. In the first part, I argue for a non-developmental reading of Locke’s argument against freedom of exercise. Locke’s view throughout all five editions of the Essay is that we do not possess freedom of exercise (at least in most cases). In the second part, I argue that, when Locke asks whether we possess freedom of specification, his question is intentionally ambiguous between two readings, a first-order reading and a higher-order reading. Locke’s view is that, on either reading, we do not possess freedom of specification (at least in any interesting sense).
Keywords John Locke  freedom  free will
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Reprint years 2017
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DOI 10.1080/09608788.2016.1260527
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References found in this work BETA

Freedom to Act.Donald Davidson - 1973 - In Ted Honderich (ed.), Essays on Freedom of Action. Routledge.
Locke on the Freedom of the Will.Vere Chappell - 1994 - In G. A. J. Rogers (ed.), Locke's Philosophy: Content and Context. Oxford University Press. pp. 101--21.
Locke on the Freedom to Will.Samuel C. Rickless - 2000 - Locke Studies 31:43-68.

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Citations of this work BETA

Cudworth on Freewill.Matthew A. Leisinger - forthcoming - Philosophers' Imprint.

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